Banner Photograph
Davis Dairy, Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee on Wildwood.
Taken by Judith Richards Shubert, September 28, 2005, Copyright

Friday, October 30, 2009

Henry Estel Slept Upstairs

Old Homeplace of John Henry and Sallie Cooley Shubert Roane Co TN Tourist Center and Museum Today
Old Homeplace of John Henry and Sallie Cooley Shubert Roane Co TN Tourist Center and Museum Today back view
Old Homeplace of John Henry and Sallie Cooley Shubert Roane Co TN Tourist Center and Museum Today Henry's upstairs room 2nd fr leftLoudon County Museum / Carmichael Inn
Loudon, Tennessee

Loudon County Museum/Carmichael Inn 501 Poplar St., Loudon, 37774. Museum includes Civil War exhibits showcased in the Carmichael Inn, a circa 1810 two-story log cabin used as a stagecoach inn. A self-guided tour of downtown Loudon and the county tells of the town’s early years and Civil War history. Open daily. Admission is free.
Located behind the courthouse in Loudon is one of the area's oldest homes. The Carmichael Inn is a two story log structure which served as a stopping place for stage coach travelers enroute from Nashville, Knoxville, and Chattanooga. Travelers would be ferried across the river to spend the night and then resume traveling the next morning by the next stagecoach. Although the exact date of construction is unknown, the first stage of construction is thought to have been completed around 1810. The log house was built by John Hudson Carmichael (1780-1840). His sons operated the Inn, the ferry, and the stagecoach. Two of his sons, James and Dan, fell in love with and married two sisters who were traveling on the stagecoach from Georgia to the Tate Springs Resort.

The Carmichael Inn can be described as an "I-house" as it is two stories tall, one room deep and two or more rooms long. It has a central chimney which opens into fireplaces in the two downstairs. The structure has a gable roof and two front and two rear doors. A two-story porch runs the length of the house. The Carmichael Inn is currently being used as a museum and visitors center.


Henry Estel Shubert son of John Henry and Sallie Cooley Shubert made circa 1945Henry Estel Shubert
November 11, 1889 Roane County, Tennessee
October 25, 1953 Loudon County, Tennessee

Children of John Henry and Sara Jane Sallie Cooley Shubert Lenoir City TN after 1953
Children of John Henry Shubert (1865-1924) and Sara Jane (Sallie) Cooley (1868-1909)
Lenoir City, Tennessee
Left to right: Arch, Ben, Ulysis, Maude, Henry Estel, and Buck
Picture made before 1953.

On the wall in Aunt Alyce's dining room there is a painting of a home, one that looks like so many others found in the little communities across our country. It is a wooden structure and it is obviously a place that holds many memories for the Shubert family, as it is lovingly displayed in a place of prominance. I asked Aunt Alyce about the picture and about why it meant so much to her and her brothers and sisters. She was eager to tell us the story about how her father, Henry Estel, had lived in the house as a child and how he had laid on his bed in the upstairs bedroom and looked out of the window, staring at the stars dreaming of what his life would be like one day. She pointed out the very window that opened up the world to him in his dreams. It was the second one from the left. Now the house stands as a testament to those days when our ancestors lived and died, worked and played in our beloved Tennessee. It is the very same structure that houses the Loudon County Museum.

Schubert and Wells Genealogy, written by W.B. Howerton Kingston, Tennessee,
September 1987, p. 26:

1900 Roane Co. Census, 9th Dist., 102-103, P. 120A, 11 June 1900
SHUBERT, John, head, 33, b. Dec. 1866 m. 13 yr.
Sarah, wife, 34, b. Aug. 1865, m. 13 yr., 6 chld., 5 living
Fred, son, 12, b. May 1888
Henry, son, 10, b. Nov. 1889
Maude, dau, 6, b. Apr. 1894
Buck, son, 1, b. Sep. 1898
Ben, son, 1, b. Sep. 1898
Deceased: Infant child of J.H. and Sallie Shubert.*
Nancy Morenan, dau. of J.H. and S.J. Shubert, b. 18 July 1901, d. 26 July 1902*
*On gravestone in Durham Cemetery, near Laurel Bluff, in Roane Co., TN

DEATH CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 55091
Name: Sarah Shuberd Date of Death: 9/26/09 Sex: Female Color: ----- Age: 40 Married or Single: Married Place of Death: Roane County Cause of Death: Cancer Place of Birth: Roane County Occupation: Farmer's wife
DEATH CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 54644 Name: Cacil Shubert Date of Death: 6/4/12 Sex: Female Color: White Age: 6 months Married or Single: ----- Place of Death: Lenoir City Cause of Death: Toa bactas (?) Place of Birth: Lenoir City Occupation: -----

Sources:

Websites:
1920 U.S. Census Roane County, Tennessee, [http://www.tngenweb.org/loudon/census/1920/snames.html] accessed:February 15, 2009.

Loudon County Death Certificates, [http://www.tngenweb.org/loudon/dcerts/dc5.html#snames] accessed:February 15, 2009.


"Carmichael Inn", Loudon County TnGenWeb [http://www.tngenweb.org/loudon/history/cinn.htm] accessed:February 15, 2009.

Photographs:
Loudon County Museum/Carmichael Inn, Digital Format, Originals belonging to Judith Richards Shubert, 2009.

Shubert, Henry Estel. Digital Format, Original photograph belonging to Robert Allen Shubert, 2009.

Shubert, children of Henry and Sallie Shubert, Digital Format, Original photograph belonging to Robert Allen Shubert, 2009

Books:
Howerton, W. B., "Schubert and Wells Genealogy," Kingston, Tennessee, September 1987.

4 comments:

Apple said...

What a neat piece of family history you have! The structure looks to be in amazingly good shape.

Janice Tracy said...

What a great story with such a neat title! And I love the photos. The Shubert family must be so happy to see this structure maintained as a local history museum.

Judith Richards Shubert said...

Thanks Apple and Janice. Yes, I think the Shubert clan is pleased that so many travelers can pass through their town and learn about their ancestors by going to this neat museum.

Linda Kilgore said...

I remember being in this house before they moved it across the river . I was 13 at the time , and my best friend Betsey and her family lived there. I was just as amazed by house than, as I am now. Humm... wonder what ever happened to my best friend Betsey...

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